Search Results for pizza

Pizza Pr0n – Margherita

DSC_0658 (1600x1060)I let my bread machine do the dough for this one while we were making a quick store run.  I knew I wanted a thin crust so I made a half recipe from here.  They were out of the mozzarella pearls I wanted so I made do with slices.  The tomatoes are a grape variety that I halved and cored with a spoon to leave just the shell.  I’m a big fan of what they would term “meat lover’s pizza” – several different meat toppings and mushrooms and olives and onions and on and on, but these minimalist types are really very good.DSC_0655 (1600x1060)I usually add the fresh basil after these come out of the oven so that it doesn’t turn black and crispy but I’ve seen them made that way, pretty sure there isn’t a rule about it.

Pizza!

20150709_164335 (1600x1060)The local Amish run store stocks a considerable selection of different flours and I took a chance on these two, not having much of a clue just what they were, exactly.  The durum name rang a bell and I thought it might be useful in making pasta but the prairie gold meant nothing at all to me.  Google to the rescue!

I didn’t have these in mind when I started looking around for a pizza dough recipe that proofs in the fridge overnight using just a little yeast, but when I came across this “Now or Later” recipe from King Arthur they seemed perfect.  I went with 1-3/4 cups of the prairie gold and 1-1/4 cup of the durum.  The mention of their pizza flavoring sent me on a separate track, trying to see if I could make something like it with ingredients on hand.  I went with a half teaspoon each of garlic and onion powder, and a couple teaspoons of dried thyme.  I let my machine mix it all, then placed it into a bowl, covered the dough with plastic, and left it overnight in the fridge.DSC_0592 (1600x1060)

After pulling from the refrigerator and letting it warm enough to be pliable it was stretched out into a baking tray, covered with plastic wrap and left to rise a little more before topping it, half with tomato sauce, ham, sausage, onion, pepper rings, and fresh mozzarella and half in the classic margherita style.DSC_0595 (1600x1060)The flours did give the dough a golden hue, and the pie tasted pretty good.  I don’t know if the flour seasonings I added helped all that much but they sure didn’t hurt it any.DSC_0596 (1600x1060)

Fun with Food: Grilled Pizza

I have friends who love grilled pizza and make it frequently. I always thought it sounded good, but haven’t tried it yet. If it sounds like something fun to try, here are two pretty reliable sources for how-to:

From J. Kenji López-Alt at Serious Eats

The Pizza Lab: The Complete Updated Guide To Grilled Pizza

Pizza on the coals from Serious Eats

Pizza on the coals from Serious Eats

How to Grill Pizza, a Crash Course

Grilled pizza is made by laying a stretched piece of dough directly on the grates over hot coals, cooking the first side, flipping it, topping it in reverse order (that’s cheese, then sauce), then returning it to the fire to cook the second side. As the second side cooks, the cheese melts, and the sauce warms. It’s as simple as that.

Here’s how to get it done.

Step 1: Pick A Nice Day

You preferably want to make your dough at least a day in advance, so look at the forecast, and plan accordingly. We picked this past Wednesday, which started out as a sunny, balmy 85°F New York summer day. Our hope was that we’d be down to comfortable lounging temperature at just about the time the grill was fired up and evening started to settle in.

Step 2: Make Dough – for the rest of the instructions click over to here.

And from Alton Brown at The Food Network:

Grilled Pizza from Alton Brown and The Food Network

Grilled Pizza from Alton Brown and The Food Network

Grilled Pizza – Various Toppings

Dough – Enough for 3 (16-inch) round pizzas:
16 ounces all-purpose flour, plus extra for peel and rolling
1 envelope instant or rapid rise yeast
1 tablespoon kosher salt
10 ounces warm water, approximately 105 degrees F
2 tablespoons olive oil, plus 2 teaspoons for bowl
1 tablespoon malted barley syrup

For complete instructions, click here.

Margherita topping – Enough to top 1 (16-inch) round pizza (recipe here)

Date and prosciutto topping – Enough to top 1 (16-inch) round pizza (recipe here)

These all sound yummy and can’t wait to experiment with them. – TaMara

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Pizza Pr0n – Meat Lover’s

DSC_0309 (1600x1060)I could have called it a pork lover’s pizza – it has bacon, pepperoni, prosciutto, ham, and Italian sausage along with provolone, Parmesan, asiago, mozzarella, and Romano.  My dough-fu was weak today, the dough was too wet and sticky to get a good stuff going into the outer rim of the crust.  You can see a few places where it bubbled out.

Mmm… Pizza!

DSC_9692 (1600x1060)Mrs J called for pizza and because it’s been a while since we had a white pizza, this broccoli/chicken/roasted garlic pie was just perfect.  I rolled some string cheese into the edge of it and made a sauce from Monterey jack and a basic white sauce.  I added two heads of roasted garlic to the sauce and troweled it on then added the par-boiled broccoli and the grilled chicken breast.  Brush some olive oil on the crust and add a good sprinkling of kosher salt.  It spent about 17 minutes in a 350 oven while in the pizza pan but still wasn’t quite there.  I managed to get it out of the pan and onto a peel without mishap for transfer to the pizza stone that pretty much lives on the bottom rack on my oven.  I kicked the dial up to 500 and kept an eye on it, giving it an additional 5-7 minutes.DSC_9696 (1600x1060)A cheese crust seems like overkill, given the cheesy nature of the sauce but I find myself eating the crusts apart from the rest of the pizza, saving them for the last.  They eat like a big soft pretzel – a cheese stuffed pretzel.DSC_9700 (1600x1060)I placed the uneaten slices back into the pan for flash freezing in the big box.  When they’re frozen solid I’ll vacuum seal the slices, they make great lunches for Mrs J to haul with her to the shelter on her volunteer days.

Crawfish and Andouille Pizza

DSC_9663 (1600x1060)I wish this had worked out better.  I tried to carry the Cajun theme too far and made a sauce of celery, green pepper, and onions with a ton of garlic and butter.  The crust just didn’t support the load when I added the crawfish tails atop that, too much moisture for the thin crust to manage.  Lots of Cajun seasonings.  It had pretty good flavor but it was just too soggy.  Back to the drawing board!  I have some of the tails left but no idea right now what to do with them.  Cajun tacos?  hmm…

Mmm… Pizza!

DSC_9425 (1600x1060)

This is another one of those doughs that stayed out on the counter all night – two cups of bread flour, a quarter teaspoon of yeast, one cup of water, a wee pinch of salt and a sprinkle of sugar.  I massaged it into place in my pizza pan and let it rise there for another hour then par baked it at 425 for five minutes.  There isn’t a real sauce, per se, just some roasted grape tomatoes that I made last summer and then froze just for something like this.  It also has bacon, thin sliced coppa, some ham, a caramelized onion, mozzarella, and some nice Parmesan grated over it at the table.

DSC_9427 (1600x1060)I’ll just pop these leftover slices into the freezer just like this and then seal the individual slices in vacuum bags, they make great grab-’em-and-go lunches for Mrs J when she heads out to the shelter.

Pizza Pr0n – Many Meats

DSC_9191 (1600x1060)I started the dough for this yesterday, 2 cups of bread flour, one cup water, 1/4t tsp yeast, a pinch of sugar and a dash of salt.  It was pretty well inflated by noon, I dumped it into a pizza pan and massaged it into shape while the oven preheated to 425-ish.  It par-baked for eight minutes and then I pulled it to furnish with toppings.  I had some leftover roasted plum tomatoes that went on first in lieu of a sauce, sprinkled on shredded mozzarella, sparingly, and then piled on the meats.  Italian sausage, already browned and drained, crispy bacon pieces, fried ham, and prosciutto that was tossed in the bacon grease to brown a bit.

Mrs J’s side got pickled onion pepper rings, I added mushrooms and chopped ripe olives.  I gave it another sprinkle of mozz and slid it back into the oven, it needed another ten minutes or so.  It must have been better than usual because Mrs J went on and on about how good it was.  I thought it one of my better efforts – she wasn’t just blowing smoke.DSC_9193 (1600x1060)

Pizza Pr0n – Pastrami

DSC_8961 (1600x1060)This was just a spur of the moment thing.  I started the dough the day before, not really sure yet what the toppings would be or I would have made a run after rye flour for the crust.  I did look for rye flour today and finally found some at the local co-op store.  I talked to a fellow there about the hard time we had finding it and he said there was a crop failure last year and it was a bit early yet for this year’s crop.  This one was so much fun I’m pretty sure you’ll be seeing something similar here, soon.DSC_8952 (1600x1060)I didn’t use any sauce, as such, but I did brush the crust with garlic oil before laying the provolone on.  Next layer was pastrami, then dill pickles, then the rest of the provolone we had on hand.DSC_8957 (1600x1060)The mustard was left off for the picture of the whole pie, I knew I wanted to use the bright yellow mustard on mine.  Mrs J favors honey mustard.DSC_8958 (1600x1060)Enjoy!

Pizza Pr0n – Margherita

This year, the margherita pizza celebrates its 125th birthday. One of the world’s favourite foods was reputedly invented at a pizzeria nowadays known as Brandi (00 39 081 416 928;brandi.it) at Salita Sant Anna Di Palazzo 1-2 in the city’s Chiaia neighbourhood. In 1889, its pizzaiolo, Raffaele Esposito, and his wife, Maria Giovanna Brandi, were summoned to the nearby Capodimonte palace and asked to invent a pizza for the then-queen, Margherita.

(Via)DSC_8853 (1600x1060)I’m sure this crust is much too thick for a purist.  I started the dough yesterday with 2 cups of bread flour and then added water to equal 65% of the weight of those 2 cups.  I used a handy electronic kitchen scale to weigh the flour but I don’t remember now what that came to.  Anyway, multiplied that by .65 to get the weight of the water I wanted.  Add a scant 1/4 tsp of yeast and a teaspoon of sugar to the liquid, plus a tablespoon of olive oil and stir into the flour.   The dough was very wet so I only kneaded it a little and then plopped it into an oiled bowl and covered with plastic and a damp towel.  It was left overnight to rise.DSC_8854 (1600x1060)I punched the dough down this morning and returned it to the bowl to continue proofing.  Why the fuss with weighing the water and flour?

Hydration affects the process of bread building and the nature of the final result. Generally speaking, the more water in the dough, the more open the final bread’s crumb. Bread can also be classified according to three categories based on hydration: stiff, standard or rustic.

(Via)

DSC_8857 (1600x1060)I rolled the dough out on a floured board and transferred it to my rimmed pan for baking, brushed the top with garlic oil, and distributed the toppings.  This one got the traditional Margherita treatment with mozzarella and Roma tomatoes and went into a 500 oven until the crust and toppings got a nice color.  Add the basil after the pie comes out of the oven or it will burn to a crisp.DSC_8859 (1600x1060)I like ground red pepper on my slices, along with fresh grated black pepper and salt.  Drizzle more of the garlic oil over it and enjoy!

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