Childhood Memories: Charleston Chew

One of the treats of being a military brat: traveling around the country and getting to indulge in regional foods that were not available in other areas (yes, I’m that old, shut up).

Charleston Chews were a New England treat for many years. Best enjoyed frozen and broken into pieces. I was at the store the other day, and these were at the checkout stand. They went immediately into my freezer. They are as “tasty” as they were when I was a kid. Meaning, overly sweet, barely chocolate-covered nougat.  But full of memories.

Other foods only available regionally when I was a kid: Mountain Dew, marshmallow fluff, Mexican food, Greek food, corn nuts…I’m sure I’m forgetting a bunch. It was fun being able to say, “what, you’ve never had that?”


 

Christmas Eve Party: Sesame Brittle

I was doing some recipe searching for a project I’ll post about later and sesame seeds were heavily featured. That put me in mind of Sesame Brittle. I thought it might be nice to have it to crumble over ice cream on the Sundae Bar on Christmas Eve.

Such a simple recipe. No candy thermometer needed. I always use oiled wax paper, but I’m wondering if oiled parchment would work better. The heat of candy on the wax paper melts it in places. Difficult to peel off.

Sesame Brittle

  • ½ cup butter
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 3/4 cup toasted sesame seeds
  • salt

saucepan, wax paper (or parchment) and baking sheet Continue reading

Sesame Brittle

I made a quick batch of sesame brittle today.  I love this stuff and it’s so easy to make.  Of course it would have been quicker if I’d remembered to oil the wax paper.  It comes off unoiled, but it’s a slow process.

Originally from March of 2010:

Sesame Brittle

  • ½ cup butter
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 3/4 cup toasted sesame seeds
  • salt

saucepan, wax paper and baking sheet

In saucepan over high heat, melt butter and sugar and stir to combine. Without stirring, cook until mixture becomes a light to medium caramel color, about 3-5 minutes, then add sesame seeds and stir in. Pour mixture onto a well oiled wax paper or well oiled parchment paper covered baking sheet and spread into an even, thin layer, about 1/8 to 1 /4-inch thick, with wooden spoon. Shape will be irregular, but don’t worry, you are just going to break it into pieces after it cools anyway. Immediately shake a bit of salt over top of mixture and lightly press into caramel using spoon. I used less than a 1/4 tsp for the entire mixture and that was plenty, though your mileage may vary. Allow to set-up for about 10-15 minutes. When brittle has hardened and cooled, break into pieces and enjoy. Store in an air-tight container.