Sammich Pr0n

The gas grill sputtered empty mid-cook, we had a spare bottle handy but that one is nearly out, too.  Maybe a trip to town next week to swap them both out for full.  I hate to go during the weekend because crowds.  Those delicious Vidalias are in season – I love a thick slice on my burgers.

Cheesesteak

Ribeye is the canonical cheesesteak meat but I nearly always use flat iron steaks.  This one was cut thin while semi-frozen and tossed in a bowl with onions, green peppers, and salt and pepper.  It marinated for an hour or so – the onions started to wilt a little.That’s provolone starting to melt into the steak and veggies.  I turned small stainless bowls upside down over the two piles to help it along.It worked pretty well.  This is the closest I’ve come to this particular style of cheesesteak, I usually go with a cheese sauce poured over the meat in the bun, and I think I prefer that method although it is just a touch more trouble.

Greek Marinade – Pork Tenderloin

20161020_1557121600x1200We saw this on one of our TV shows, the diner guy chopped a pork tenderloin into smallish pieces, put them into a small hotel pan, and started adding marinade ingredients.  I scribbled them down as best I could because we had just bought a tenderloin and this looked like a great recipe:  Olive oil, lemon juice, lime juice, garlic, oregano, salt and pepper.  He said cover and refrigerate for a week.  OK.  We nearly forgot it because it was in the basement fridge but we got it out in time.20161020_1621181600x1200I wish I had let the grill heat better but I was afraid to overcook the meat.  I brushed it with garlic oil while it was on the grill and that really flared up.  I did manage to get a touch of brown on there.  It was really tender, and the garlic was prominent.  I think the long marinade in lemon/lime juice had o lot to do with tenderizing it.20161020_1621281600x1200I served it over a bed of wild rice with a side of Brussel sprouts and corn sauteed in duck fat.

Grilled Lemon Salmon with Corn Pepper Relish

This is a great recipe and you can cook it on the grill or indoors in the oven.  Add baked potatoes or rice and fresh greens from the garden for a nice summer meal.  Serves 4.

Grilled Lemon Salmon:

  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 tbsp fresh lemon juice
  • 1 tbsp lemon zest
  • 4 – 6 oz skinless salmon fillets

zip-lock bag

Add ingredients to bag and refrigerate 1 hour or overnight.  Grill on a clean, oiled grill or use a well oiled grilling pan, or broil in oven in a heavy skillet or broiler.  Cook for 4 minutes on each side, or until fish flakes easily.  Serve with relish.

Corn Pepper Relish:

  • 1 cup cooked corn (or canned, drained)
  • 4 green onions, chopped
  • ½ green pepper chopped
  • ½ red pepper chopped
  • ½ yellow pepper chopped
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 3 tbsp red wine vinegar
  • 2 tbsp chopped cilantro
  • 1 tbsp chopped jalapeno
  • salt & pepper to taste
  • ½ tsp crushed garlic

bowl

Combine all ingredients and let marinate while salmon cooks.  You can use the remaining peppers in a salad for your next dinner.



 

Friday Recipe Exchange: Fun with Gadgets

DSC_7651 (1600x1060)

When I was sick last month, I watched a lot of cooking shows while resting on the couch. One that caught my imagination was different things that can be made in a waffle iron. That spurred the idea for tonight’s recipe exchange. Unexpected recipes for various cooking appliances.

First up, Biscuit Breakfast Sandwiches made in the waffle iron. Not as elegant as JeffreyW’s delicious looking waffle, bacon and egg sandwich pictured above, but it’s a quick- less than 10-minute – tasty breakfast. Click here for recipe and directions.

One of the best ideas I’ve heard in a long time is Grilling Pizza outside on the grill. Recipes and instruction here.

And finally, make a spinach lasagna in the slow-cooker that tastes like it was oven-baked, with this recipe for Slow-cooker Lasagna here.

What’s on your plate this weekend? Anyone else have unusual recipes for kitchen gadgets? Anyone harvesting from their garden yet? It’s just about time for my favorites here, peas and new potatoes, along with lettuce, spinach and asparagus.

Tonight’s featured recipe solved my biggest issue with hash browns, how to make them easy, quick and crisp. The waffle iron was the unexpected answer.

Cooking the hashbrowns

It’s so easy.  The best part is, there is no need to wring the water from the shredded potatoes, my least favorite step of making hash browns. It’s messy, but without that, skillet fried hash browns never crisp up properly, even with my cast iron press.

The waffle iron to the rescue. Mine is 7 inches across and enough for one potato, but it’s so fast, it was easy to make enough for everyone. I just put the finished ones in the oven to stay warm.

I shredded the potato and lightly patted the shreds with a paper towel, I mixed in a little olive oil, salt, pepper, shredded onion and garlic powder. I brushed oil on both plates and pre-heated the iron, mine has temp settings, so I put it on the highest setting. I spread the shredded potato thinly over the iron, closed the lid tight and let cook for 2 minutes, checked on them, then removed when they were crisp enough. Over the four potatoes I made, the longest time was 4:30 minutes, shortest time was a little less than 3 minutes.

Waffle hashbrowns

It was so easy and the cleanup  was basically wiping out the waffle iron with a paper towel. The next time I do it, I think I’ll add some shredded green or red pepper. It’s definitely a good way to put my waffle iron to use.

That’s it for this week. No Bixby update, although he learned how to use a drinking fountain yesterday. Pretty damn cute. I’ll try to get video for next week. Hope you have a good weekend – TaMara

 

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Smokin’!

20130617_101038 [1600x1200]The new grill is getting a workout.  I’m slowly learning the ins and outs of cooking on this thing.  The larger items are easier because the lower temps give you plenty of time, and the indirect heat is not going to suddenly flare up and burn everything to a crisp.  This style of grill has its drawbacks for smoking – biggest is the bother that arises when you need to replenish the wood chips.  Good thing is that you needn’t do that very often, one refill and you will have plenty of smoke flavor.  A remote temperature probe is highly recommended.  They make them now that are wifi and bluetooth enabled and I am gadget freak enough that they call to me over the Amazon mind beam. DSC_6245 [1600x1200]This pork shoulder spent the day in there.  It had a dry rub, and whole cloves of garlic inserted into slits cut into the meat.DSC_6246 [1600x1200]I left it to cool overnight in a foil pan and then broke it down into baggie sized lots for the freezer and fridge.DSC_6247 [1600x1200]The sauce is another one of those make it up as you go things that make cooking fun.  I put the roast into a pan for the last few hours and added apple juice concentrate, a splash of dark soy, some black vinegar, a half cup of red wine vinegar, and a squeeze of bbq sauce from a bottle.  As I was breaking the roast down this morning I reduced the remaining sauce and juices by half after adding several cloves of crushed and minced garlic.  Delicious!

Pizza!

DSC_6139 [1600x1200]Doing a pizza in the Weber grill is going to take some more study.  I can really crank the temps in there, I was hitting 550 degrees easily and I think 600 isn’t asking too much of it.  Only thing is the dough has to be very thin and the topping relatively sparse for this to work.  This one wasn’t made that way and by the time the toppings were done the bottom was a uniform black, like those high spots on the top side.  I like plenty of toppings and a medium thick crust so the next pie is going in at a lower temperature.  This one has sausage, onions, peppers, and mushrooms with Kraft Italian blend shredded cheeses over my awesome sauce.  And yes, I ate it.