Smoked Brisket

I smoked my first brisket, even though I’ve had my wood pellet grill for almost two years now.

And by I, I mean my brother mostly. I made up the rub, using brown sugar, paprika, salt, pepper, garlic powder, onion powder, cayenne, hot chili, cumin and oregano.  But my brother did most of the smoking, setting the temperature and watching over it.

I paid close attention and asked lots of questions, so I think I could do it myself next time.


 

Smokin’!

20130617_101038 [1600x1200]The new grill is getting a workout.  I’m slowly learning the ins and outs of cooking on this thing.  The larger items are easier because the lower temps give you plenty of time, and the indirect heat is not going to suddenly flare up and burn everything to a crisp.  This style of grill has its drawbacks for smoking – biggest is the bother that arises when you need to replenish the wood chips.  Good thing is that you needn’t do that very often, one refill and you will have plenty of smoke flavor.  A remote temperature probe is highly recommended.  They make them now that are wifi and bluetooth enabled and I am gadget freak enough that they call to me over the Amazon mind beam. DSC_6245 [1600x1200]This pork shoulder spent the day in there.  It had a dry rub, and whole cloves of garlic inserted into slits cut into the meat.DSC_6246 [1600x1200]I left it to cool overnight in a foil pan and then broke it down into baggie sized lots for the freezer and fridge.DSC_6247 [1600x1200]The sauce is another one of those make it up as you go things that make cooking fun.  I put the roast into a pan for the last few hours and added apple juice concentrate, a splash of dark soy, some black vinegar, a half cup of red wine vinegar, and a squeeze of bbq sauce from a bottle.  As I was breaking the roast down this morning I reduced the remaining sauce and juices by half after adding several cloves of crushed and minced garlic.  Delicious!