Paprika – the App

No, it’s not a condiment selection tool, it’s a handy dandy recipe app that can do a lot more than I need it to (for now, anyway) but I really like the way it can scrape the ingredients and directions for a recipe off a a cluttered page and just present you with the essential information.  It pretty much gives you what you see on a lot of sites when you click on the “print this recipe” button.screenshot_20170113-155257-1600x1200

Paprika has its own web browser that works much like Chrome or Firefox.  If you know the url of a particular site you can enter that into the address bar or just enter search terms like I did in the screenshot above.  screenshot_20170113-155326-1600x1200Once you have the recipe page up you click on the “save recipe” button on the bottom right and the app does it’s magic.  It will chug through a downloading recipe notification and then bring you to the next screen:screenshot_20170113-155921-1600x1200It’s an edit screen, by default it puts all recipes into “uncategorized” but you can put them wherever you like by clicking the “change” button.  The first time you click that you will get pretty much an empty screen but click the big plus sign (+) and you can start your own system.screenshot_20170113-155046-1600x1200I’ve just begun compiling a recipe database on this thing, you may recognize some of the recipes.  Anyway, click or tap on a recipe and it takes you to that stripped down iteration:screenshot_20170113-155119-1600x1200

It’s especially handy when rendered in this two column format, the directions column scrolls independently of the ingredients so you don’t have to go back to see just how much milk they are talking about when the directions tell you to go ahead and add it now.

It has more functionality that this brief sketch shows, it will compile a grocery list and it’s a meal planner.

Photo Fun

img_20161009_172337_processedNice treatment of Gabe in the Prisma app, with the appropriately named “Hunter” filter.  He hasn’t hunted with much success beyond catching grasshoppers although he is showing an unfortunate enthusiasm for digging after moles.

I downloaded another app today and it’s promising enough that I coughed up the $2.99 for the upgrade.  I’ve had Eye-Fi cards in several of my cameras for some time now.  They automatically upload pictures to my Synology NAS so that they are available to any machine on my network, and I’ve been wanting something similar for my Android phone.  I think I have found it in the PhotoSync app.

An advantage this app has over the Eye-Fi card is that the strength of the wifi radio in the phone is miles ahead of the tiny little thing they have crammed into the SD card.  I like the automatic upload that happens as soon as I take the shot, but you can trigger an upload manually if you prefer.  That way if you flub the exposure or snap the photo too soon you can decline to upload that one, you select those you want to transfer.  I figure I can as easily delete it from the network folder as I can on the phone.  Lots more at the PhotoSync link.

Sammich Pr0n – Hoagie

20160325_172343_HDR_1 (2) (1600x1060)It was a good sammich but I’m using it as an excuse to play with the image editing software that Google released today for free.  It isn’t really new, it’s been out for a few years – they’ve been selling it for $150.  Purchasers who paid for the suite this year will be getting a refund.  The software is in the form of plugins for the Adobe products you’ve heard about even if you don’t own any of them:  Lightroom, Photoshop, and Photoshop Elements.  The first two are pretty spendy but the Elements app isn’t too bad, I gave $40 for mine.  One of the plugins will function as a standalone app and that is the one I used on the sammich: HDR Efex Pro.  I’m still at the how do I save it as a .Jpeg and where does it go when I click “save” stage.  I’m mostly just clicking through the presets for now.