Carnitas

Lazy Sunday.  I went to the store this morning and was thinking it was Saturday until I got there.  Made no difference for the grocery trip because they are open Sunday mornings.  I was going to buy some beer to cook the refried beans I had planned but the blue laws restrict beer sales until after noon.  I had some stout beer at home so I wasn’t too bummed.  I think it worked fine.

I wanted to do a South Western themed dinner but didn’t want to do the usual nachos.  I have some roast pork put up in Mason jars that I figured would make great carnitas.

Carnitas, literally “little meats”, is a type of braised or roasted (often after first being simmered) pork in Mexican cuisine

…Prior to serving, the pork, along with some of the rendered liquid, is placed in fairly shallow pans to maximize surface area, then roasted at high (375 to 425 °F or 190 to 220 °C) heat for a few minutes to produce the desired alternating texture of succulent softness and caramelized crispness.

–via Wikipedia

I was right, the canned pork came out great, some crispy brown edges and butter tender.  Yummy!  Traditionally served on corn tortillas but the fried flour tortillas worked fine.

The refried beans were simple enough, start some onions in oil, sprinkle in some cumin seeds and add some minced garlic and a minced jalapeno.  Then dump in a couple of cans of pinto beans and use a potato masher to mash half of them into mush.  Simmer the mixture for an hour or more, adding beer (or chicken stock) as needed to keep them from drying out.  They need stirring pretty often to keep the beans from sticking.

Enchiladas were tortillas stuffed with chorizo sausage, onions, cheese, and a bit of ancho sauce.  Cover the stuffed rolls with a cheese sauce, enchilada sauce, drizzle some ancho sauce on, bake at 350 for 30 minutes then sprinkle some shredded cheese on top and return to the heat.

The guacamole was about as uncomplicated as it could be:  Mash two avocados with some finely chopped onion and the juice of a lime, add a teaspoon of salt–Ta Da!

Enjoy!

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Whole Grain Stout Mustard

This is the start of what may become a continuing series.  I’ve been enjoying various whole grain or “stone ground” mustards, you may have spotted some of them on various sammiches I’ve pictured here and elsewhere.  It’s not a thing that I thought about before but I have been seeing mentions here and there of making your own condiments-relishes, ketchup, pickles of many varieties.  I saw a recipe for a mustard made with dark (stout) beer and decided to give it a go. _DSC2503 [1024x768]

I’ve lost the link to the recipe so I’ll reproduce it here:

12 oz stout beer

1-1/2 c black mustard seeds (whole)

1 c red wine vinegar

1 T kosher salt

1 t ground back pepper

1/4 t ground cinnamon

1/4 t ground cloves

1/4 t ground nutmeg

1/4 t ground allspice

Combine all the above in a stainless or other inert bowl, cover with plastic wrap and let sit at room temperature for 24-48 hours.  Dump it all after the soaking into a food processor or blender and pulse until the seeds are coarsely ground and the mixture thickens.  Ready for use immediately or store in refrigerator for six months.